66 Books of the Bible

by
Richard Klein  Phd

INTRODUCTION TO THE 66 BOOKS OF THE BIBLE

An excellant overview of all of the books of the Bible by Richard Klein Phd

Sixty-Six Books

An Introduction to
Every Book in
the Canonical Scriptures

Dr. Rich Klein,
Sugar Land, TX

richardrklein@yahoo.com

INTRODUCTION

The Holy Bible in one English translation contains 3,566,480 letters, 810,697 words, 31,175 verses, 1,189 chapters and 66 books. The most convenient way to do a survey of the entire Bible is to do it one book at a time.
Sixty-Six Books is a product that contains a survey of every book of the canonical biblical scriptures. Each individual book survey serves the purpose of introducing the reader to a basic informational scan of that particular biblical book.
A survey of this nature can prove useful when it is applied to such events as a Sunday School class, a growth group of whatever sort, personal discipling efforts, midweek church wide services, Sunday evening teaching sessions, an individual’s desire to gain a general acquaintance with the entire Bible, collegiate level Bible survey courses, and other useful options as the Lord would lead.
The books of the canonical biblical scriptures are surveyed for their title, authorship, approximate date of composition, time covered by the material in the book, key word, key phrase, key verse or verses, key chapter or chapters, purpose or purposes, outline, message summary, and where Christ can be seen.
May the Lord bless this simple instrument to edify and equip you to be more effective in the ministry He has called you to accomplish.
GENESIS

Title: Genesis (“in beginning” is the first word in the Hebrew text)

Author: Moses (John 5:45-47)

Date of composition: fifteenth century B.C.

Time covered: approximately 2,400 years from the creation to the death of Joseph

Key word: “beginning”

Key phrase: “in the beginning”

Key verse: 1:1

Key chapter: 15 (ratification of the Abrahamic Covenant)

Purpose: to provide an account of both physical and spiritual origins

Outline: I. Historical beginnings of the human race –
primeval history (1-11)

II. Biographical beginnings of the chosen race –
patriarchal history (12-50)

Message summary: Genesis is the foundation for everything else that is to come in the Holy Bible.

Christ seen: in the seed of the woman (3); Isaac, your “only son” (22)
EXODUS

Title: Exodus (“going out” is the first word in the Greek translation)

Author: Moses (24:4, 7; 34:27-28; John 7:22)

Date of composition: fifteenth century B.C.

Time covered: the 430 years that span the trials of the Israelites in Egypt to the erection of the tabernacle at Mount Sinai

Key word: “redemption”

Key sentence: “Let my people go.”

Key verses: 19:4-6

Key chapters: 12-14 (the Passover and the passing out of Egypt by Israel)

Purpose: to provide an account of Israel’s deliverance from Egypt

Outline: I. Israel’s terrible subjection (1-4)

II. Israel’s incredible redemption (5-18)

III. Israel’s marvelous legislation (19-40)

Message summary: Exodus presents Israel as a family system that required rules, roles, and rituals which God begins to provide for them at Mount Sinai.

Christ seen: in the Passover Lamb (12); the rock (17); the tabernacle (25-31, 35-40)

LEVITICUS

Title: Leviticus (named because it is the handbook for Levitical priesthood and ritual)

Author: Moses (1:1; 4:1; 5:14; 6:1, 8, 19, 24; 7:22, 28; 8:1; 11:1; 12:1; 13:1; 14:1, 33; 15:1; 16:1; 17:1; 18:1; 19:1; 20:1; 21:1, 16; 22:1, 17, 26; 23:1, 9, 23, 26, 33; 24:1, 13; 25:1; 27:1, 34)

Date of composition: fifteenth century B.C.

Time covered: the fifty days between the erection of the
tabernacle and the departure from Mount Sinai

Key word: “holiness”

Key sentence: “Be holy, for I am holy.”

Key verses: 20:7-8

Key chapter: 16 (contains the Day of Atonement, Israel’s most
sacred holiday)

Purpose: to present vital truth regarding sacrificial atonement
and the possibility of personal sanctification

Outline: I. The way to God via sacrifice (1-10)

II. The walk with God via sanctification (11-27)

Message summary: Whereas Exodus presents God getting His people out of Egypt, Leviticus presents God getting Egypt out of His people!

Christ seen: in the sacrifices (1-7); Day of Atonement (16)

NUMBERS

Title: Numbers (named for the two numberings of the sons of Israel recorded in the book)

Author: Moses (1:1; 33:2; 36:13; Nehemiah 13:1-2)

Date of composition: fifteenth century B.C.

Time covered: the thirty-eight years from Mount Sinai to east
of the Jordan River on the plains of Moab

Key word: “numbered”

Key sentence: “Take a census of the entire congregation.”

Key verses: 14:28-34

Key chapter: 14 (the critical turning point in Israel’s wilderness journey)

Purpose: to demonstrate what happens when God’s people
become unbelieving and disobedient

Outline: I. The old generation (1:1-10:10)

II. The tragic generation (10:11-21:35)

III. The new generation (22:1-36:13)

Message summary: The older generation of unbelieving and disobedient Israelites must die in the wilderness in order to set the younger generation free to go unhindered into the Promised Land.

Christ seen: in the Ashes of the Red Heifer Ceremony (19); smitten rock (20); brass serpent (21); as the Star out of Jacob (24)

DEUTERONOMY

Title: Deuteronomy (named from the Septuagint Translation of 17:18 as “this second law”)

Author: Moses (1:1; 31:9, 22, 24-26)

Date of composition: fifteenth century B.C.

Time covered: approximately the six weeks that include a
review of the entire wilderness wanderings

Key word: “remember”

Key phrase: “a copy of this Law”

Key verses: 10:12-13

Key chapter: 28 (the consequences that result when the Covenant of the Mosaic Law is broken)

Purposes: to encourage Israel’s obedience of the Law of God and to warn them of what happens when they are disobedient

Outline: I. Moses’ first discourse – a historical review
or a look backward (1-4)

II. Moses’ second discourse – a forensic repetition
or a look forward (5-30)

III. Moses’ third discourse – a prophetic revelation
or a look upward (31-34)

Message summary: In a series of ten sermons couched in three discourses Moses sought to prepare the Israelites for their future in the Promised Land by reminding them of their past.
Christ seen: in a “prophet like Moses” (18)
JOSHUA

Title: Joshua (named for the main character of the book)

Author: Joshua (1:1; 24:25-26)

Date of composition: 1375 B.C.

Time covered: 1406-1375 B.C. (from the death of Moses to the death of Joshua)

Key word: possess

Key sentence: “Be strong and courageous!”

Key verses: 1:8; 21:43-45

Key chapter: 24 (a historical retrospect offered, and an eloquent challenge accepted)

Purpose: to show how Israel experienced the fulfillment of a share of the land portion of the Abrahamic Covenant as a token of the fulfillment of the Palestinian Covenant

Outline: I. Claiming the land (1-5)

II. Conquering the land (6-12)

III. Colonizing the land (13-24)

Message summary: The Book of Joshua describes the invasion, conquest, division, and settlement of Canaan by the Israelites.

Christ seen: in the Captain of the Lord’s Host (5); cities of refuge (20)

JUDGES

Title: Judges (named for those individuals recorded in the
book who exercised the judicial office)

Author: Samuel (1 Samuel 10:25; Baba Bathra 14b)

Date of composition: eleventh century B.C.

Time covered: approximately three hundred years from the
death of Joshua to the death of Samson

Key word: decline-cycles

Key sentence: “Everyone did that which is right in their own eyes.”

Key verses: 2:11-23; 17:6; 21:25

Key chapter: 2 (a miniature of the entire book as it records the transition of the godly generation to an ungodly generation, the format of decline cycling, and why God did not destroy the Canaanites)

Purpose: to teach us on the one hand not to presume and on
the other hand not to despair

Outline: I. National deterioration (1-2)

II. National deliverance (3-16)

III. National depravity (17-21)

Message summary: The Book of Judges records the spiritual conflicts of the nation of Israel within itself, and the physical conflicts with the Canaanite people.

Christ seen: as the Angel of the Lord (2)

RUTH

Title: Ruth (named for the heroine of the book)

Author: Samuel (Baba Bathra 15a)

Date of composition: eleventh century B.C.

Time covered: 1:1; approximately eleven years; between Judges 16 and 17

Key word: “kinsman”

Key sentence: “I will redeem it.”

Key verse: 3:13

Key chapter: 4 (an illustration from human experience of the spiritual aspect of the kinsman-redeemer doctrine)

Purpose: to reveal God as the controlling agent behind the remarkable events that occurs in the book

Outline: I. Ruth renouncing (1)

II. Ruth requesting (2)

III. Ruth reaping (3)

IV. Ruth rejoicing (4)

Message summary: Ruth is the story of a pocket of faith within a land given over to apostasy. A remnant in the land is recorded as keeping the Law of God, while the masses in the land go unrestrained.

Christ seen: in the kinsman redeemer (3)

FIRST SAMUEL

Title: First Samuel (named for the primary author)

Authors: Samuel (chapters 1-24; 10:25) and Nathan/Gad (25- 31; 1 Chronicles 29:29)

Date of composition: eleventh century B.C.

Time covered: 115 years overlapping the twelfth and eleventh centuries B.C. from the birth of Judge Samuel to the death of King Saul

Key word: “king”

Key sentence: “The Spirit of the Lord came mightily upon David.”

Key verses: 15:22-23

Key chapter: 15 (records the tragic forfeiting of the monarchy by Saul)

Purpose: to provide a record of the transition of Israel from a theocracy to a monarchy

Outline: I. Eli the priest (1-4)

II. Samuel the judge (5-8)

III. Saul the king (9-31)

Message summary: First Samuel is the story of what happens when a judge, priest, or potentate is disobedient to the covenant of God.

SECOND SAMUEL

Title: Second Samuel (named for the main character of the first book of Samuel)

Authors: Nathan and Gad (1 Chronicles 29:29)

Date of composition: eleventh century B.C.

Time covered: the forty years spanning the reign of King David

Key word: “David”

Key sentence: “They anointed David king over Israel.”

Key verse: 7:12

Key chapter: 7 (contains the first record of the Davidic Covenant)

Purpose: to provide an account of the career of David while king of Israel

Outline: I. David’s triumphs (1-10)

II. David’s transgressions (11)

III. David’s troubles (12-24)

Message summary: Second Samuel presents the failures of the earthly King David and the hope of success under the future heavenly Greater King David.

Christ seen: in the Davidic Covenant (7)
FIRST KINGS

Title: First Kings (named for the kings whose deeds it narrates)

Author: Jeremiah (11:41; 14:19, 29; 15:7, 23, 31; 16:5, 14, 27)

Date of composition: after 561 B.C.

Time covered: approximately 120 years from the death of King David to the monarchial ascension of King Ahaziah of Israel

Key word: “division”

Key phrase: “the word of the Lord”

Key verses: 12:16-19

Key chapter: 12 (the critical turning point when the united kingdom Israel becomes a divided kingdom)

Purpose: to provide an account of the failure of human government in contrast to the unfailing government of Almighty God

Outline: I. The united kingdom (1-11)

II. The divided kingdom (12-22)

Message summary: First Kings is the story of the passing of the rulership of Israel as a United Kingdom from King David to his son Solomon, the death of Solomon, and the kingdom’s tragic division beginning with Rehoboam,
David’s grandson.

Christ seen: as “Greater than Solomon” (Mt. 12:42)

SECOND KINGS

Title: Second Kings (named for the kings whose deeds it narrates)

Author: Jeremiah (Baba Bathra 15a)

Date of composition: after 561 B.C.

Time covered: approximately 300 years, from King Ahaziah
of Israel through King Jehoiachin of Judah

Key word: “captivity”

Key phrase: “man of God”

Key verses: 17:13-20

Key chapter: 17 (the rejection by the people of the prophetic Word of God and their acceptance of idolatry)

Purpose: to provide an account of prophetic efforts calling the people of God back to obedience to the covenant

Outline: I. The annals of the northern kingdom of Israel
(1-10)

II. The alternating annals of the northern and southern kingdoms
(11-17)

III. The annals of the southern kingdom of Judah
(18-25)

Message summary: Second Kings provides the contemporary histories of the Kingdom of Israel and the Kingdom of Judah, their mutual collapse, and their being taken into Assyrian and Babylonian captivity, respectively.

FIRST CHRONICLES

Title: First Chronicles (named for the chronicles of the life and reign of King David)

Author: Ezra (1 Chronicles 27:24; 29:29-30; Baba Bathra 15a)

Date of composition: approximately 458 B.C.

Time covered: approximately 3,000 years from Adam to David’s death

Key word: “house”

Key sentence: “So all Israel was enrolled by genealogies.”

Key verses: 17:11-14

Key chapter: 17 (the establishment of the Davidic Covenant)

Purpose: to provide the post-captivity generation of Israelite returnees with an accurate account of both the Davidic genealogy and important information related to the priesthood

Outline: I. The royal line of David (1-9)

II. The reign of David (10-29)

Message summary: First Chronicles confines itself primarily to the history of the Southern Kingdom of Judah and the reign David.

Christ seen: in the “Lord of Heaven and Earth” (21)

SECOND CHRONICLES

Title: Second Chronicles (named for the chronicles of the post- Davidic kings)

Author: Ezra (Baba Bathra 15a)

Date of composition: about 458 B.C.

Time covered: the 427 years from King Solomon to the decree
of the Persian King Cyrus to rebuild the Temple

Key word: “kings”

Key sentence: “Seek the Lord.”

Key verses: 7:14; 15:2-4; 16:9a

Key chapter: 34 (the record of the revival and reforms under King Josiah)

Purpose: to provide a divine editorial on the spiritual character of David’s dynasty

Outline: I. The reign of Solomon (1-9)

II. The reigns of the kings of Judah (10-36)

Message summary: Second Chronicles is another version of the Book of Judges in that it features the relapses of leadership into flagrant sin and their reformations there from.

EZRA

Title: Ezra (named for the author and principle character of the book)

Author: Ezra (editor, compiler)

Date of composition: 458 B.C.

Time covered: 538-458 B.C.

Key word: “temple”

Key sentence: “Go up.”

Key verses: 1:3; 7:10

Key chapter: 6 (records the completion and rededication of the Temple, which in turn stimulated the remnant to obedience in keeping the Passover celebration and obeying the laws of separation)

Purpose: to provide an account of the providential workings of the God of Israel on behalf of His people in fulfillment of prophecy

Outline: I. The first return to Jerusalem (1-2)

II. The restoration of the temple (3-6)

III. The second return to Jerusalem (7-8)

IV. The reformation of the people (9-10)

Message summary: Ezra relates Zerubbabel bringing back a remnant of the exiled Jews to reestablish Temple worship. Ezra relates his own bringing back of a second remnant fifty- eight years later, and encourages revival among the people of God.
NEHEMIAH

Title: Nehemiah (named for the principle character in the book)

Author: Nehemiah (chapters 1-7, 11-13) and Ezra (chapters
8-10)

Date of composition: late fifth century B.C.

Time covered: from the third return of the Jews from captivity in 445 B.C. to the second purification in 425 B.C.

Key word: “gates”

Key sentence: “The good hand of God was upon me.”

Key verse: 1:3

Key chapters: 9-10 (national reaffirmation of loyalty to the Mosaic covenant)

Purpose: to provide an account of the people of God’s
post-exilic physical and spiritual restoration

Outline: I. Rebuilding the wall and gates (1-7)

II. Restoring the people (8-13)

Message summary: The Book of Nehemiah is concerned with Judah’s geographical, political, military, and spiritual restoration.

Christ seen: in the gates of the city of Jerusalem (3)

ESTHER

Title: Esther (named for the principle character in the book)

Author: Mordecai (9:20; 10:2)

Date of composition: fifth century B.C.

Time covered: from 486-464 B.C.

Key word: “queen”

Key sentence: “If I perish, I perish.”

Key verse: 4:14

Key chapter: 8 (records the pivotal event of the book)

Purpose: to provide in the days following the Babylonian Captivity an account of the Hebrew Nation’s deliverance from annihilation, the consequence of which would have been the cutting off of any Messianic hope

Outline: I. The feast of Ahasuerus (1-2)

II. The feast of Esther (3-7)

III. The feast of Purim (8-10)

Message summary: The Book of Esther illustrates the providential care of God for His chosen
people by His creating a number of historical coincidences. The Book of Esther also justifies the celebration of that care by God, in the Feast of Purim.

Christ seen: in the advocacy of Esther and the saving work
of Mordecai (10)
JOB

Title: Job (named for the principle character in the book)

Author: Job, who writes in the third person

Date of composition: during the lifetime of the patriarch Jacob; the nineteenth century B.C.

Time covered: a few weeks from his mid-life but including a brief reference to the rest of Job’s life

Key word: “why”

Key sentence: “I repent in dust and ashes.”

Key verse: 37:23

Key chapter: 42 (Job repents of his self-righteous martyr complex.)

Purpose: to confront the problem of the people of God experiencing suffering

Outline: I. Prologue or dilemmas of Job (1-2)

II. Dialogue or debates of Job (3-41)

III. Epilogue or deliverances of Job (42)

Message summary: Job is the story of a man who in the sovereignty of God is allowed to suffer and thereby become instructive as to the character of man and God.

Christ seen: in the resurrected and returning redeemer (19)
PSALMS

Title: Psalms (named for the songs of praise accompanied
by instrumentation contained in the Psalter)

Author: directly attributed to David in fifty-three of the superscriptions; see also 18:50; 72:20; 78:70; 89:3, 20, 35, 49; 122:5; 132:1, 10-11, 17; 144:10

Date of composition in their present form: approximately 1500 B.C. to 500 B.C.

Time covered: from Moses through Zechariah the prophet

Key word: “praise”

Key phrase: “blessed is the man”

Key verse: 19:14

Key psalm: 23 (a psalm for every believer)

Purpose: to proclaim that the Godly are not only qualified to praise Jehovah but to be recipients of His blessing

Outline: I. The Genesis book (1-41)

II. The Exodus book (42-72)

III. The Leviticus book (73-89)

IV. The Numbers book (90-106)

V. The Deuteronomy book (107-150)

Message summary: The Book of Psalms provides a psalm for
the life experience of every human being.

Christ seen: in the Messianic psalms (2, 8, 16, 22, 24, 34-35, 40- 41, 45, 68-69, 72, 109-110, 118)

PROVERBS

Title: Proverbs (named for this collection of wise comparisons)

Author and editors: Solomon and Hezekiah’s men (1 Kings
4:32; Proverbs 1:1; 10:1; 25:1; 30:1; 31:1; Ecclesiastes 12:9; Baba Bathra 15a)

Date of composition: between 970 and 686 B.C.

Time covered: from King Solomon through King Hezekiah

Key word: “wisdom”

Key sentence: “Train up a child.”

Key verses: 3:5-6

Key chapter: 31 (qualities of an excellent wife)

Purpose: to show the application of divine wisdom to the varied aspects of daily life in an evil world

Outline: I. Youthful Solomon’s proverbs (1-9)

II. Mature Solomon’s proverbs (10-24)

III. Hezekiah’s collection of proverbs (25-29)

IV. Agur Jakeh’s proverbs (30)

V. Lemuel’s proverbs (31)

Message summary: Proverbs shows that wisdom is vastly superior to folly.

Christ seen: in the wisdom of God (1, 8)

ECCLESIASTES

Title: Ecclesiastes (named for the leader of an assembly who is delivering an oration)

Author: Solomon (1:1, 12, 16; 2:7, 9, 12; 4:13-14; 12:8-10)

Date of composition: approximately 931 B.C.

Time covered: the lifetime of King Solomon

Key word: “vanity”

Key phrase: “under the sun”

Key verses: 1:13-14; 12:1, 13-14

Key chapter: 12 (the conclusion of all things)

Purpose: to disillusion those who would put their trust in the
culture of this life

Outline: I. The preacher’s subject (1:1-11)

II. The preacher’s sermon (1:12-11:6)

III. The preacher’s summary (11:7-12:14)

Message summary: King Solomon unsuccessfully attempted without God to satisfy every humanistic
desire he had and thereby he serves as an
exemplar of such futility.

Christ seen: as the ultimate “preacher,” son of David, and king
in Jerusalem (1)

SONG OF SOLOMON

Title: Song of Solomon (named for the song writer and author of the book)

Author: Solomon (1:1, 4-5, 12; 3:7, 9, 11; 7:5; 8:11-12)

Date of composition: 970 B.C.

Time covered: a few weeks

Key word: “beloved”

Key sentence: “I am my beloved, and my beloved is mine.”

Key verse: 8:7

Key chapter: 7 (illustrates the everlasting love of the
Bridegroom for His bride)

Purpose: to exalt marriage love

Outline: I. Courtship (1:1-3:5)

II. Wedding (3:6-5:1)

III. Marriage (5:2-8:14)

Message summary: The Song of Solomon traces through five epithalamiums (wedding songs) the maturation of the relationship between a bridegroom and his bride.

Christ seen: as the beloved bridegroom (2)

ISAIAH

Title: Isaiah (named for the prophet who wrote the book)

Author: Isaiah (1:1; 2:1; 13:1; Matthew 3:3 and twenty-one other affirmations in the New Testament)

Date of composition: 681 B.C.

Time covered: approximately the sixty years spanning the reigns of King Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah

Key word: “comfort”

Key phrase: “The Holy One of Israel”

Key verses: 61:1-3

Key chapter(s): 52:13-53:12 (the Servant of God humiliated and glorified)

Purpose: to give a panoramic prophetic picture of the life and
ministry of the Messiah

Outline: I. The prophetic or Assyrian section (1-35)

II. The historic or transitional section (36-39)

III. The messianic or Babylonian section (40-66)

Message summary: Isaiah presents the Messiah, His kingdom, and the kingdom’s inclusion of Gentiles.

Christ seen: in the Servant Songs (42, 49-50); as the suffering servant (52-53)

JEREMIAH

Title: Jeremiah (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Jeremiah and others (1:1; 51:64)

Date of compilation: after 582 B.C.

Time covered: 627-582 B.C. (1:2-3; 40-44)

Key word: “backsliding”

Key phrase: “the Lord of Hosts, the God of Israel”

Key verses: 7:23-24

Key chapter: 31 (declaration of the New Covenant)

Purpose: to provide an account of the last five kings of Judah, the destruction of the temple,
the desolation of Jerusalem, and the Jews
being carried off into captivity to Babylon

Outline: I. The prophet’s mandate (1)

II. The prophet’s message (2-51)

III. The prophet’s misery (52)

Message summary: Jeremiah is the story of the last appeal by Jehovah to Judah to avoid an inevitable doom and seventy years of captivity.

Christ seen: in the weeping prophet (9); as the “righteous branch” (23, 33)
LAMENTATIONS

Title: Lamentations (named for the plaintive nature of the book)

Author: Jeremiah (Septuagint superscription)

Date of composition: 586 B.C.

Time covered: the destruction of Jerusalem in 586 B.C.

Key words: “Zion; Jerusalem”

Key sentence: “How lonely sits the city.”

Key verses: 2:17; 3:22-23

Key chapter: 3 (a didactic presentation of Jeremiah’s pain and hope of relief)

Purpose: to provide an account of the affliction and destruction of the Holy City

Outline: I. First poem: Jerusalem’s plight / the city (1)

II. Second poem: Jehovah’s anger / the sanctuary (2)

III. Third poem: Jeremiah’s sorrow / the prophet (3)

IV. Fourth poem: Jehovah’s anger / the people (4)

V. Fifth poem: Jeremiah’s prayer / the prayer (5)

Message summary: Violation of Covenant brings wrath and
desolation even upon God’s chosen people.

Christ seen: as the “man of sorrows” (1)

EZEKIEL

Title: Ezekiel (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Ezekiel (1:1-3; 24:24; 25:1)

Date of composition: 563 B.C.

Time covered: 597-571 B.C.

Key word: “blood”

Key sentence: “They shall know that I am the Lord.”

Key verses: 43:1-2

Key chapter: 37 (the physical reunion and spiritual restoration of all Israel)

Purpose: to prophesy the destruction of the temple and city of
Jerusalem and future restoration of both

Outline: I. Pre-siege / Judah and Jerusalem (1-24)

II. Mid-siege / the Gentile nations (25-32, 35)

III. Post-siege / the Millennial Kingdom (33-34, 36-48)

Message summary: Ezekiel is about the consequences a nation experiences when it departs from the Lord
and the Lord departs from it.

Christ seen: as the Son of Man (2); Messiah/King (21); True Shepherd (34)

DANIEL

Title: Daniel (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Daniel (7:15, 28; 8:1, 15, 27; 9:2; 10:1-2, 7; 12:4, 5)

Date of composition: 536 B.C.

Time covered: 606-536 B.C.

Key word: “kingdoms”

Key sentence: “The Most High Rules.”

Key verses: 2:20-22

Key chapter: 9 (the Messianic chronological framework)

Purpose: to outline history as it relates to God’s chosen people,
thereby providing assurance that God is sovereign

Outline: I. Historical (1-6)

II. Prophetical (7-12)

Message summary: The Book of Daniel, by means of the experiences of Daniel and his companions, features the faithfulness of God’s people
and the faithfulness of God to His people.

Christ seen: as the “stone cut out of the mountain” (2); “Messiah the Prince” or prince of peace (9)

HOSEA

Title: Hosea (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Hosea (1:1-2)

Date of composition: 710 B.C.

Time covered: 755-710 B.C. (during the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah, and Jeroboam of Israel)

Key word: “harlotry”

Key sentence: “Sow the wind, reap the whirlwind.”

Key verses: 2:4, 23

Key chapter: 14 (Israel will be humiliated and then glorified.)

Purpose: to offer a call to repentance while foretelling future restoration

Outline: I. The prophet (1-3)

II. The prophecy (4-14)

Message summary: The Book of Hosea sets forth the prophet Hosea’s domestic life as an illustration of God’s dealings with an unfaithful Israel and yet Israel’s incredible ultimate restoration.

Christ seen: as “David their king” (3)

JOEL

Title: Joel (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Joel (1:1; Acts 2:16)

Date of composition: 780 B.C.

Time covered: 839-780 B.C.

Key word: “day”

Key phrase: “the Day of the Lord”

Key verses: 2:28-32

Key chapter: 2 (the coming great and awesome Day of the Lord)

Purpose: to provide an immediate and prophetical application of the Day of the Lord

Outline: I. Ruin and repentance (1:1-2:17)

II. Revival and restoration (2:18-3:21)

Message summary: Joel gives us a picture of Judah under the curse of the violated Palestinian Covenant while at the same time being called to genuine repentance, revival, and restoration. The prophet deals with the principle of divine judgment by affirming
that God will act in history, especially during the end times.

Christ seen: as the Lord of Bountiful Provision (2)

AMOS

Title: Amos (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Amos (1:1; 7:8, 10-12, 14; 8:1-2)

Date of composition: 755 B.C.

Time covered: 765-755 B.C. (during the reigns of Jeroboam II
of Israel and Uzziah of Judah)

Key word: “punish”

Key phrase: “for three transgressions and for four”

Key verses: 4:11-12

Key chapter: 9 (containing prophecies of the restoration of Israel based on the Abrahamic, Palestinian, and Davidic Covenants)

Purpose: to pronounce the punishment of Israel and the Gentile nations with the promise of a future restoration for Israel

Outline: I. Eight prophecies (1-2)

II. Three sermons (3-6)

III. Five visions (7-9:1-10)

IV. Five promises (9:11-15)

Message summary: Amos, a herdsman and caretaker of fig trees, proclaims that God is sovereign over all nations and holds them accountable for their treatment of one another.
OBADIAH

Title: Obadiah (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Obadiah (1)

Date of composition: 843 B.C.

Time covered: 850-843 B.C.

Key word: “day”

Key phrase: “cut off”

Key verse: 21

Key chapter: 1 (promises of the Abrahamic Covenant validated)

Purpose: to pronounce doom on Edom for having violated
the Abrahamic Covenant

Outline: I. The doom of Edom predicted (1-16)

II. The deliverance of Israel predicted (17-21)

Message summary: Obadiah is the story of divine retribution for treachery against Jacob (Israel) by Edom (Esau).

JONAH

Title: Jonah (named for the main character in the prophecy)

Author: Jonah (1:1; 3:1)

Date of composition: 782 B.C.

Time covered: 825-782 B.C. (during the reigns of Jehoash and Jeroboam II of the Northern Kingdom)

Key word: “anger”

Key sentence: “He went down.”

Key verse: 4:2

Key chapter: 4 (the revelation of Jonah’s spiritual bigotry)

Purpose: to demonstrate that God’s love and mercy are for
Gentiles as well as Jews

Outline: I. Fleeing from God (1)

II. Fleeing to God (2)

III. Flying for God (3)

IV. Flying at God (4)

Message summary: Jonah teaches that God is no respecter of persons and the prophet of the Lord must learn and practice that lesson.

Christ seen: as the risen prophet (2)
MICAH

Title: Micah (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Micah (1:1; Jeremiah 26:18)

Date of composition: 687 B.C.

Time covered: 750-686 B.C. (during the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah, and Pekah and Hoshea of Israel)

Key word: “hear”

Key sentence: “What does the Lord require of you?”

Key verse: 6:8

Key chapter: 5 (Messiah’s deliverance of His people)

Purpose: to show God’s feelings when His people transgress the Law while at the same time becoming consumed with hypocritical ritualism

Outline: I. Hear (1:2) – peoples

II. Hear (3:1) – rulers

III. Hear (6:1) – hills and mountains

Message summary: Micah consists of three sermons that condemn the apostasy of the people of God while concurrently featuring promises of future Messianic restoration.

Christ seen: as the “Ruler in Israel” (5)
NAHUM

Title: Nahum (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Nahum (1:1)

Date of composition: before 612 B.C.

Time covered: 663-612 B.C. (during the reigns of Manasseh, Amon, and Josiah of Judah)

Key word: “oracle”

Key sentence: “The Lord by no means will leave the guilty unpunished.”

Key verses: 1:2-3

Key chapter: 1 (some attributes of God on display)

Purpose: to provide a supplementary account accompanying the Book of Jonah one hundred and fifty years after the prophet Jonah’s Nineveh adventure

Outline: I. Destruction of Nineveh decreed (1)

II. Destruction of Nineveh described (2)

III. Destruction of Nineveh deserved (3)

Message summary: Nahum teaches that very bad people eventually receive what they deserve, even if they are exceedingly powerful and appear to have escaped the judgment of man and God.

Christ seen: as the prophet of vengeance (1)
HABAKKUK

Title: Habakkuk (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Habakkuk (1:1; 3:1)

Date of composition: 605 B.C.

Time covered: 626-605 B.C. (during the reigns of Josiah and Jehoiakim of Judah)

Key words: “why; violence”

Key sentence: “The righteous will live by his faith.”

Key verse: 2:4

Key chapter: 3 (a psalm of Habakkuk)

Purpose: to set forth the conundrum of why a Holy God would use the more wicked Babylonians to judge the backslidden chosen people of God

Outline: I. The burden or dialogue (1)

II. The vision or dirge (2)

III. The psalm or doxology (3)

Message summary: The Book of Habakkuk contains a dialogue between the prophet and God wherein the prophet complains about the Lord’s apparent lack of concern over Judah’s sin, His unrighteous method of dealing with it, His response to his complaint, and Habakkuk’s reconciliation to God via his closing prayer, song, and psalm of trust and triumph.

ZEPHANIAH

Title: Zephaniah (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Zephaniah (1:1)

Date of composition: after 622 B.C. (Josiah’s revival) and
before 612 B.C. (the fall of Nineveh)

Time covered: 640-612 B.C. (during the reign of Josiah of Judah)

Key word: “remnant”

Key phrase: “the Day of the Lord”

Key verses: 1:14-16; 3:12-13

Key chapter: 3 (records the two distinct portions of the Day of the Lord, judgment and restoration)

Purpose: to warn the House of Judah and her enemies of the coming Day of Wrath, while at the same time comforting the faithful with promises of restoration

Outline: I. A bad day / judgment announced (1:1-3:8)

II. A glad day / justice announced (3:9-20)

Message summary: Zephaniah sees the coming Day of the Lord as locally and historically fulfilled in the desolation of Babylon and in the preservation of a faithful remnant.

Christ seen: as “King of Israel, Lord in the midst” (3)
HAGGAI

Title: Haggai (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Haggai (1:1, 3, 13; 2:1, 10, 13-14, 20)

Date of composition: 520 B.C.

Time covered: four months

Key words: “Consider your ways.”

Key phrase: “The House of the Lord”

Key verses: 1:7-8

Key chapter: 2 (the Tribulation and Millennium prophesied)

Purpose: to encourage Governor Zerubbabel, High Priest Joshua, and the first returning post-exilic remnant to rebuild the temple

Outline: I. Build / 1st day, 6th month (1)

II. Behold / 21st day, 7th month (2:1-9)

III. Behave / 24th day, 9th month (2:10-19)

IV. Believe / 24th day, 9th month (2:20-23)

Message summary: Haggai, first of the post-exilic prophets, declares that God’s Temple must be the highest priority in the lives of the returning Israelites.

Christ seen: as prophet, prince, priest, and servant (2)
ZECHARIAH

Title: Zechariah (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Zechariah (1:1, 7; 7:1, 8)

Date of composition: between October / November 520 B.C. to 475 B.C.

Time covered: forty-five years

Key word: “temple”

Key phrase: “the Lord of Hosts”

Key verses: 6:12-13

Key chapter: 14 (the triumph of Jerusalem in the final Battle of Armageddon)

Purpose: to stir up the remnant to complete the unfinished second Temple and to prophesy of Messiah’s first and second advents to offer and establish His glorious Millennial Kingdom

Outline: I. Eight apocalyptic visions (1-6)

II. Four didactic messages (7-8)

III. Two prophetic burdens (9-14)

Message summary: Zechariah wrote to encourage the post- exilic returnees to finish rebuilding the Temple and to give them hope that a future king (Messiah) would one day return to establish His eternal kingdom.

Christ seen: as servant, Branch (3); smitten shepherd (13); “king over all the earth;” priest (14)
MALACHI

Title: Malachi (named for the source of the prophecy)

Author: Malachi (1:1)

Date of composition: after 444 B.C.; as late as 410 B.C.

Time covered: 444-410 B.C.

Key words: “who, what, where, when, why, how”

Key phrase: “the Lord of Hosts”

Key verses: 3:8-10

Key chapter: 3 (the dramatic prophecy of the coming of John the Baptist and also Jesus the Messiah)

Purpose: to reprove the priesthood for desecrating the Temple
worship, to reprove the people for neglecting the temple, and to encourage the faithful remnant with Messianic promises

Outline: I. A religious message to the priesthood
about past privileges (1:1-2:9)

II. A social message to the masses
about present pollutions (2:10-17)

III. A moral message to the faithful
about future promises (3-4)

Message summary: Malachi seeks to arouse the priesthood and laity to an interest in that which pleases God, priestly and Temple matters.
Christ seen: as “Messenger of the Covenant,” cleanser of the Temple; and “Sun of Righteousness” (3)
MATTHEW

Title: Matthew (named for the author of the book)

Author: Matthew Levi Alphaeus (9:9; 10:3)

Date of composition: between A.D. 37 and 70 (4:5; 27:7-8, 53; 28:15)

Time covered: 4 B.C. through A.D. 30 (from the birth of the
Lord Jesus Christ to His ascension)

Key word: “king’”

Key phrase: “the King of the Jews”

Key verses: 16:13-16

Key chapter: 12 (the formal rejection of Jesus Christ as the Messiah by the religious leadership of Israel)

Purpose: to convince non-Christian Hebrew reading Palestinian Jews that Jesus Christ is the Messiah

Outline: I. Introduction (1:1-4:16)

II. Development “from that time” (4:17-16:20)

III. Development “from that time” (16:21-28:20)

Message summary: Matthew shows his readers that Jesus Christ is a teacher superior to the lawgiver Moses.

Christ seen: as “King of the Jews” (2; 27:29; 27:37)

MARK

Title: Mark (named for the author of the book)

Author: John Mark (1 Peter 5:13)

Date of composition: approximately A.D. 64 (the death date of Simon Peter)

Time covered: A.D. 27 to 30 (from the appearance of John the
Baptist to the ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ)

Key word: “immediately”

Key sentence: Jesus came “to give His life a ransom for many.”

Key verse: 10:45

Key chapter: 8 (change of emphasis in Jesus’ ministry from serving the general public to fortifying His disciples for His forthcoming passion)

Purpose: to present to Latin readers Jesus Christ as servant and Savior

Outline: I. Presentation of the servant (1:1-2:12)

II. Opposition to the servant (2:13-8:26)

III. Instruction by the servant (8:27-10:52)

IV. Rejection of the servant (11:1-15:47)

V. Resurrection of the servant (16:1-20)

Message summary: Jesus is shown as constantly serving and meeting every need of all people.

Christ seen: as the “servant of Jehovah” (10)

LUKE

Title: Luke (named for the author of the book)

Author: Doctor Luke (Colossians 4:14; Philemon 24; 2 Timothy 4:11)

Date of composition: approximately A.D. 60 (Acts 21:8, 15-16; 23:33; 24:27)

Time covered: 4 B.C. to A.D. 30 (from the appearance of Zacharias, father of John the Baptist, to the ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ)

Key word: “salvation”

Key phrase: “the Son of Man”

Key verses: 1:1-4; 19:10

Key chapter: 15 (captures the crux of Luke’s gospel)

Purpose: to present to Greek readers Jesus Christ as the sacrifice of God for mankind’s sin

Outline: I. Jerusalem narrative (1:1-4:13)

II. Galilee narrative (4:14-9:50)

III. Samaritan narrative (9:51-19:44)

IV. Jerusalem narrative (19:45-24:53)

Message summary: Jesus is portrayed in fullest humanity by devoting much of this gospel to His human feelings and experiences.

Christ seen: as the “Son of Man” (19)

JOHN

Title: John (named for the author of the book)

Author: John Zebedee (youngest of the Twelve Apostles; cousin of Jesus; 13:23; 18:15-16; 19:26, 35; 20:2; 21:7, 20, 24-25)

Date of composition: approximately A.D. 95

Time covered: the beginning to A.D. 30 (eternity to the near
ascension of the Lord Jesus Christ)

Key word: “believe”

Key phrase: “For God so loved the world”

Key verses: 20:30-31

Key chapter: 3 (contains the necessity of spiritual rebirth)

Purpose: to present to a world-wide audience an apologetic polemic designed for refuting error regarding the deity of the Lord Jesus Christ

Outline: I. First Judean visit (1:1-2:12)

II. Second Judean visit (2:13-4:54)

III. Third Judean visit (5-6)

IV. Fourth Judean visit (7-21)

Message summary: Jesus is revealed as eternal Son of God Who became incarnate to make God the Father knowable in a personal way.

Christ seen: as the “Word” (logos), “lamb of God” (1); serpent in wilderness (3); manna from Heaven (6)

ACTS

Title: Acts (named for the post-ascension actions of the apostles)

Author: Doctor Luke (Luke 1:1-4; Acts 1:1-2; 16:10-40;
20:6-28:31; Colossians 4:14)

Date of composition: approximately A.D. 64

Time covered: from the ascension of Christ in A.D. 30 to the Roman confinement of Paul in A.D. 62

Key word: “growth”

Key sentence: “The Word of the Lord was growing mightily.”

Key verse: 1:8

Key chapter: 2 (provides an account of the initial baptizing work of the Holy Spirit whereby He indwelt all believers in the Lord Jesus Christ and thus blended every believer into one body, the church)

Purpose: to detail the expansion of the early church as the
fruit of the Gospel message and not as an anti- Semitic or anti-establishmentarian effort

Outline: I. Witness in Jerusalem (1:1-8:4)

II. Witness in Judea and Samaria (8:5-12:25)

III. Witness to the ends of the earth (13:1-28:31)

Message summary: Acts serves as a bridge from the life of Jesus to the successful completion of the first generation of the church.

Christ seen: as our ascended Lord (1, 7)
ROMANS

Title: Romans (named for the primary audience)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1)

Date of composition: early A.D. 57

Time covered: a very brief period while stayed at Corinth
(15:25-26; 16:1, 23; 1 Corinthians 1:14)

Key word: “gospel”

Key sentence: “The gospel is the power of God for salvation to
everyone who believes.”

Key verses: 1:16-17

Key chapters: 6-8 (offers teaching for a successful Christian life)

Purpose: to announce plans for an upcoming ministry visit to Rome and to solicit prayer that this forthcoming effort might be blessed

Outline: I. Sin (1-3)

II. Salvation (4-5)

III. Sanctification (6-8)

IV. Sovereignty (9-11)

V. Service (12-16)

Message summary: Romans is an exposition of the gospel of the grace of God for all human beings.

Christ seen: as “our righteousness” (3)

FIRST CORINTHIANS

Title: First Corinthians (named for the primary audience of
this second epistle of Paul to that church community
located in Corinth, Greece; note 1 Corinthians 5:9)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 16:21)

Date of composition: spring of A.D. 56

Time covered: a very brief period while staying at Ephesus (15:32; 16:8-9, 19)

Key word: “order”

Key sentence: “Let all things be done properly and in an orderly manner.”

Key verse: 14:40

Key chapters: 12-14 (presents the doctrine of spiritual gifts)

Purpose: to exhort a local church to move from positional
sanctification to practical sanctification

Outline: I. An answer to the report of divisions (1-4)

II. An answer to the report of disorder (5-6)

III. An answer to the letter of questions (7-16)

Message summary: First Corinthians addresses from the perspective of Paul the issues and questions that have been brought to his
attention by various written
communications.

Christ seen: as the “first fruits” (15)

SECOND CORINTHIANS

Title: Second Corinthians (named for the primary audience of this fourth epistle of Paul to that church community located in Corinth; note 1 Corinthians 5:9 and 2 Corinthians 2:4; 7:9, 12)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 10:1)

Date of composition: fall of A.D. 56

Time covered: a very brief period while staying in
Macedonia (1:16; 2:13; 7:5; 8:1; 11:9)

Key word: “defense”

Key sentence: “We are defending ourselves.”

Key verses: 5:17, 21

Key chapters: 8-9 (the most complete revelation of God’s plan
for giving by the New Testament Church)

Purposes: to defend Paul’s calling to ministry, his apostolic credentials, and his apostolic conduct

Outline: I. Account (explanation) of Paul’s ministry (1-5)

II. Appeal (solicitation) to his converts (6-9)

III. Answer (vindication) to his critics (10-13)

Message summary: Second Corinthians is an autobiographical response to negative messages brought to him by Titus. Paul expresses his thanksgiving for the repentant majority while appealing to the rebellious minority to accept his authority.

Christ seen: as a sin offering (5)
GALATIANS

Title: Galatians (named for the South Galatian churches
Paul had planted during his first missionary venture
and which he addresses in this epistle)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 5:2)

Date of composition: approximately A.D. 47 or just before the Jerusalem Council; compare Galatians 2:11-14 with Acts 15:1-31.

Time covered: very brief

Key word: “liberty”

Key sentence: “The just shall live by faith.”

Key verse: 2:20

Key chapter: 5 (the staggering impact of freedom in Christ)

Purposes: to vindicate Paul’s apostleship; to contend for justification by faith alone; to show that Christian
liberty is not a license for bad behavior

Outline: I. Gospel of grace defended biographically or liberty authenticated (1-2)

II. Gospel of grace explained doctrinally or liberty argued (3-4)

III. Gospel of grace applied practically or
liberty related (5-6)

Message summary: Galatians was written to counter the false teaching that a person must keep the Mosaic Law to be saved and sanctified.

Christ seen: as “born of a woman” (4)

EPHESIANS

Title: Ephesians (named for the city in Asia Minor where Paul
had planted a church and which he addresses here)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 3:1)

Date of composition: fall of A.D. 60

Time covered: very brief

Key word: “love”

Key phrase: “in Christ”

Key verses: 2:8-10

Key chapter: 6 (preparation for spiritual warfare)

Purpose: to emphasize the need for love in the church,
marriage, family, workplace, and society

Outline: I. Calling of the church (1-3) / its position
(our wealth in Christ)

II. Conduct of the church (4-6) / its practice
(our walk in Christ)

Message summary: Ephesians presents the responsibility
of the Body of Christ to behave in accordance with its heavenly calling as applied to its earthly setting.

Christ seen: “the groom” (5)
PHILIPPIANS

Title: Philippians (named for the first city in Europe where
Paul had planted a church and which he addresses here)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1)

Date of composition: spring of A.D. 63

Time covered: very brief

Key words: “joy; rejoice”

Key sentence: “For me to live is Christ and to die is gain.”

Key verse: 4:8

Key chapter: 2 (the humility of Jesus revealed by His leaving
Heaven for earth and then taking on the form of a servant)

Purposes: to express gratitude for their monetary support of him as he ministered the Word of God and to stress the need for unity there in the Philippian church

Outline: I. Paul’s triumphant experience (1)

II. Paul’s tremendous examples (2)

III. Paul’s typical exhortations (3-4)

Message summary: Philippians expresses Paul’s fond affection for the saints, appreciation for their consistent testimony and their support, while lovingly urging them to center their thoughts and deeds upon the pursuit of their personal Christ likeness.

Christ seen: as the rich supplier of every need (4)

COLOSSIANS

Title: Colossians (named for the city in Asia Minor where Paul
was now addressing a church there he had not planted)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 4:18)

Date of composition: fall of A.D. 60

Time covered: very brief

Key words: “in Him”

Key phrase: “the fullness of Deity”

Key verses: 2:9; 3:1-2

Key chapter: 3 (links the three themes of the book together –
the believer’s risen life, behavior, and brotherhood, showing their cause and effect relationship)

Purpose: to proclaim the preeminence and sufficiency of Christ in all things

Outline: I. Truth about Christ (1)

II. Truth about cults (2)

III. Truth about Christianity (3-4)

Message summary: Colossians combats Jewish legalism (angelism), Hellenistic philosophy (early Gnosticism), and Oriental mysticism (exclusivism).

Christ seen: as creator and head of the church (1)

FIRST THESSALONIANS

Title: First Thessalonians (named for the primary audience of
Paul’s first epistle to that church community)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 2:18)

Date of composition: spring of A.D. 50 or seventeen years after Paul’s conversion

Time covered: very brief

Key word: “comfort”

Key sentence: “He delivers us from the wrath to come.”

Key verse: 2:12

Key chapter: 4 (includes the central passage in the New Testament related to the rapture)

Purpose: to respond with encouragement at the good report regarding the plight of the young believers

Outline: I. Reputation of the church (1)

II. Review of the church (2-3)

III. Removal of the church (4)

IV. Responsibility of the church (5)

Message summary: First Thessalonians introduces the theme of the Second Coming of Christ into the context of a local church going through severe persecution.

Christ seen: as the returning Lord (4)

SECOND THESSALONIANS

Title: Second Thessalonians (named for the primary audience of Paul’s follow-up epistle to the church community located in Thessalonica)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1; 3:17)

Date of composition: Spring of A.D. 51 or within five weeks
to twelve months after the writing of First Thessalonians

Time covered: very brief

Key word: “advent”

Key phrase: “the Day of the Lord”

Key verses: 2:1-2

Key chapter: 2 (written to correct the fallacious teaching that the Day of the Lord had already come upon the Thessalonian church community)

Purpose: to confront eschatological error that led some of the
believers to disorderly conduct

Outline: I. Exultation (1)

II. Explanation (2)

III. Exhortation (3)

Message summary: Second Thessalonians traces Paul’s concern about an inaccurate understanding of the day of the Lord
and the resulting inappropriate lifestyle changes that occur.

Christ seen: as the returning judge (1)

FIRST TIMOTHY

Title: First Timothy (serves as the first pastoral epistle and is named for the primary recipient, a former Pauline disciple and current pastor at Ephesus)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1)

Date of composition: during a period following the Book of Acts; winter of A.D. 63 (predates the Neronian persecution begun July 19, 64)

Key word: “church”

Key phrase: “. . . know how one ought to conduct himself in the household of God.”

Key verse: 3:15

Key chapter: 3 (contains the qualifications for the leadership of God’s church)

Purpose: to address the evolving need for structure in the local church since it appeared that Paul might be delayed from making a return visit to Ephesus

Outline: I. Challenges to the church (1:1-3:15)

II. Challenges to the Christian (3:16-6:21)

Message summary: First Timothy presents a paradigm for
church organization and oversight.

Christ seen: as the one mediator and ransom for all (2)

SECOND TIMOTHY

Title: Second Timothy (serves as the second of two pastoral
epistles written to and named for the primary recipient, a
former Pauline disciple and current pastor at Ephesus)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:1, 11)

Date of composition: written three years after Paul’s first Roman imprisonment and during Paul’s second and final Roman imprisonment; late fall of A.D. 65 (4:13, 21)

Key word: “fulfill”

Key sentence: “Endure hardship.”

Key verses: 2:15; 3:15-17; 4:2

Key chapter: 2 (contains the keys to a successful and enduring ministry)

Purposes: to stir up Timothy’s Holy Spirit-given gift; to encourage Timothy to continue a discipling ministry; to urge him to remain steady in his personal faith and practice as a believer in the Lord Jesus Christ and local church pastor

Outline: I. Precedents from the past (1)

II. Postures in the present (2)

III. Prospects for the future (3-4)

Message summary: Second Timothy is the record of the Apostle Paul’s written appeal to Pastor Timothy to carry on the work that the condemned apostle is about to relinquish.

Christ seen: as the righteous judge and bestower of crowns (4)

TITUS

Title: Titus (serves as a pastoral epistle and is named for the
primary recipient, a former Pauline associate currently serving as a pastor on the island of Crete)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1:4)

Date of composition: winter of A.D. 63

Key word: “deeds”

Key sentence: “Be careful to engage in good deeds.”

Key verses: 1:5; 3:8

Key chapter: 2 (summarizes the most important commands to be obeyed to insure godly relationships in the church)

Purposes: to provide instructions that would guide in the appointing of church leadership throughout the island of Crete; to address legalistic and mystically inclined Jewish Christians; to address the island’s famous reputation for infamous moral behavior

Outline: I. Concerning leadership (1)

II. Concerning fellowship (2-3)

Message summary: The Epistle to Titus provides
encouragement and exhortation to accomplish the task of organizing the churches in Crete under Titus’ firm supervision as the apostle Paul’s apostolic representative.

Christ seen: as our great God, Savior, and redeemer (2)

PHILEMON

Title: Philemon (serves as a pastoral epistle written to and named for the primary recipient, who was a convert
of the Apostle Paul and now a leader in the Colossian church meeting in Philemon’s home)

Author: Paul the Apostle (1, 9, 19)

Date of composition: fall of A.D. 60

Key word: “useful”

Key sentence: “Charge that to my account.”

Key verse: 11

Key chapter: 1 (relates the story of the effort of Paul to reconcile Philemon and his runaway slave Onesimus)

Purposes: to be an appendix of the Epistle to the Colossians that serves as a brilliant cameo of gospel truth while also serving as a letter of commendation for a returning runaway slave to his master’s household

Outline: I. The praise of Philemon (1-7)

II. The plea for Onesimus (8-17)

III. The pledge of Paul (18-25)

Message summary: The Epistle to Philemon develops the transition from bondage to brotherhood that is brought about by Christian love and forgiveness.

Christ seen: as kinsman redeemer (1)

HEBREWS

Title: Hebrews (named for the recipients of the epistle who were Jewish Christians living in Jerusalem)

Author: Paul the Apostle dictating the epistle to his personal
physician and amanuensis Luke (13:23-25)

Date of composition: between A.D. 50 and A.D. 70

Key word: “better”

Key sentence: “He is also the mediator of a better covenant.”

Key verses: 12:1-3

Key chapter: 11 (contains the Hall of Faith with the records of many saints of God who willingly took God at His word, even when there was nothing to hold on to but His promises)

Purpose: to feature the superiority of Christ in His person and work above everything else that could be important to Jewish believers

Outline: I. Superiority of the person of Christ (1:1-4:13)

II. Superiority of the work of Christ (4:14-10:18)

III. Superiority of the walk of faith (10:19-13:25)

Message summary: The Book of Hebrews is a sermonic epistle that traces by means of a series of comparisons the reality that the religion of
Christ is superior to anything that had preceded it.

Christ seen: as the believer’s rest (1); in Melchizedek (5-7);
as High Priest (9); as the leader and perfecter
of faith (12)

JAMES

Title: James (named for the author of the epistle)

Author: James (“The Just”; “Ole Camel-knees”; half brother of the Lord Jesus Christ and moderator of the Jerusalem Council)

Date of composition: preceding the Jerusalem council held in the late A.D. 40’s and certainly before James’ martyrdom in A.D. 62

Key word: “works”

Key sentence: “Faith, if it has no works, is dead.”

Key verses: 2:14, 24

Key chapter: 2 (contains the demand that justification with God be accompanied by good deeds before men)

Purpose: to exhort the early Christian believers to a Biblical faith that works

Outline: I. Suffer with confidence (1)

II. Serve with compassion (2)

III. Speak with care (3)

IV. Submit with contrition (4)

V. Supplicate with concern (5)

Message summary: The Epistle of James is the New Testament version of the Old Testament Proverbs pleading for a vital Christianity evidenced by a faith that produces good works.

Christ seen: as Lord of Hosts (5)

FIRST PETER

Title: Peter (named for the author of his first extant epistle)

Author: Simon Peter (the chief apostle of the Twelve; 1 Peter 1:1; 5:1-2; John 21:15-17)

Date of composition: predates the severe Neronian
persecution; early A.D. 65 (1 Peter 1:6)

Key word: “suffering”

Key sentence: “Share the sufferings of Christ.”

Key verses: 4:12-13

Key chapter: 4 (contains counsel for handling persecution and
suffering brought on by one’s Christian testimony)

Purpose: to exhort suffering Christian believers to make
Christ their model as they share in His sufferings

Outline: I. Salvation / destiny of the Christian (1:1-2:12)

II. Submission / duty of the Christian (2:13-3:12)

III. Suffering / discipline of the Christian (3:13-5:14)

Message summary: The Epistle of First Peter discusses the need for the believer, regardless of their
stress level, to maintain a good testimony in their various relationships, as a
witness to non-believers.

Christ seen: as the theme of Old Testament prophecy (1)

SECOND PETER

Title: Second Peter (named for the author of his second extant epistle)

Author: Simon Peter (the chief apostle of the Twelve; Matthew 17:1-2; Mark 9:2-3; Luke 9:28-29; 1 Peter 1:1; 2 Peter 1:1; 1:17-18; 3:1)

Date of composition: late fall of A.D. 65 (2 Peter 1:13-15)

Key word: “guard”

Key sentence: “Be on your guard.”

Key verses: 3:11-13

Key chapter: 1 (contains the clearest definition of the relationship between God and man as regards the issue of Inspiration)

Purpose: to call the Christian to spiritual growth so that he can combat apostasy while he looks forward to the Lord’s Second Advent

Outline: I. Cultivation of Christian character (1)

II. Condemnation of false teachers (2)

III. Confident of Christ’s return (3)

Message summary: The Epistle of Second Peter sounds the warning that believers will be confronted by false teachers who will be enthusiastically peddling their damaging doctrines in the Last Days.

Christ seen: as the long-suffering savior (3)

FIRST JOHN

Title: First John (named for the author of this his first extant epistle)

Author: John Zebedee (youngest of the Twelve Apostles; cousin of Jesus; 1 John 1:1-3; John 1:1; 13:23, 25; 19:35; 21:20)

Date of composition: between A.D. 66 and A.D. 98

Key word: “know”

Key sentence: “I have written to you who believe . . . that you may know . . .”

Key verses: 5:11-13

Key chapter: 1 (contains a formula for the restoration of fellowship with God)

Purposes: to call the Christian to a restoration of fellowship with God, to assure the believer of the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit, and to encourage the practice of righteousness and love for the saints, who in turn would produce joy and confidence

Outline: I. Basis of fellowship (1:1-2:27)

II. Behavior of fellowship (2:28-5:21)

Message summary: The Epistle of First John presents the subject of fellowship with God and among the people of God. The writer presents three distinct cycles of thought which form in their combination pictures of truth and
cumulative application in support of his main line of instruction.

Christ seen: as the “Word of Life” (1)

SECOND JOHN

Title: Second John (named for the author of this his second extant epistle)

Author: John Zebedee (youngest of the Twelve Apostles; cousin of Jesus; now aged; 1)

Date of composition: between A.D. 66 and A.D. 98

Key word: “watch”

Key sentence: “Watch yourselves that you do not lose what we have accomplished, but that you may receive a full reward.”

Key verse: 8

Key chapter: 1 (contains the exhortation to be careful of counterfeits)

Purposes: to call the Christian to practice the truth while at the
same time protecting it

Outline: I. John commends the lady (1-4)

II. John commands the lady (5-6)

III. John cautions the lady (7-13)

Message summary: The Epistle of Second John illustrates by means of a personal application the basic theme of steadfastness in the practice and protection of the apostolic doctrine John’s readers had become aware of during their
initiation into the Christian Faith.

Christ seen: as the target of Anti-Christ (1)

THIRD JOHN

Title: Third John (named for the author of this his third extant epistle)

Author: John Zebedee (youngest of the Twelve Apostles; cousin of Jesus; now aged; 1)

Date of composition: between A.D. 66 and A.D. 98

Key word: “walk”

Key sentence: “I have no greater joy than this, to hear of my
children walking in the truth.”

Key verses: 3-4

Key chapter: 1 (contains the exhortation to walk according to sound doctrine)

Purpose: to urge a local church leader to confront the
inappropriate dominance of a church member

Outline: I. John commends Gaius (1-8)

II. John condemns Diotrephes (9-11)

III. John recommends Demetrius (12-14)

Message summary: The Epistle of Third John features three different individuals, one who demonstrates spiritual prosperity in his personal life, another who demonstrates pride and a domineering spirit in his
church life, and another who demonstrates a good example in his public life.

Christ seen: as the personification of truth (1)

JUDE

Title: Jude (named for the author of this epistle)

Author: Jude 1 (the half brother of the Lord Jesus Christ; Mt.
13:55)

Date of composition: A.D. 66

Key word: “remember”

Key sentence: “Now I desire to remind you.”

Key verses: 24-25

Key chapter: 1 (contains the exhortation to keep steadfast
in the Christian Faith)

Purpose: to condemn the practices of heretical teachers in the
church and counsel the reader to stand firm in his
faith, to grow in his faith, and to contend for the faith

Outline: I. Description of false teachers (1-16)

II. Defense against false teachers (17-25)

Message summary: The Epistle of Jude exhorts the believer to remain vigilant lest they be robbed of an essential article of the Christian Faith by ungodly men,
posing as Christian teachers.

Christ seen: as the believer’s eternal security (1)

REVELATION

Title: Revelation (named for the primary purpose of the book)

Author: John Zebedee (youngest of the Twelve Apostles; cousin of Jesus; 1:1, 4, 9; 22:8)

Date of composition: A.D. 96

Key word: “revelation”

Key phrase: “The Revelation of Jesus Christ”

Key verse: 1:19

Key chapters: 19-22 (understanding the completion of history
radically impacts the present)

Purposes: to testify to the faith and hope of persecuted Christians as well as offer the prospect that the people of God will ultimately triumph over all their enemies and be given eternal rewards

Outline: I. Things past (1)

II. Things present (2-3)

III. Things future (4-22)

Message summary: The Book of Revelation is the book of consummation. In the book, the divine program of redemption is brought to full fruition, and the holy name of God is entirely vindicated before all creation.

Christ seen: “as King of Kings, and Lord of Lords” (19:16)